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need_for_secondary_education [2015/03/23 00:24]
nlozano01_mail.roosevelt.edu
need_for_secondary_education [2015/03/23 00:37] (current)
nlozano01_mail.roosevelt.edu
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 Neil Kokemuller reported, "​Classroom instruction has changed as well. Teachers are often evaluated by students on their use of audio-visual tools to enhance learning. In junior high, high school and college, PowerPoint is often used for typical daily lectures. Computer simulations,​ virtual models, smart boards and digital tools are also used for in-class instruction or out-of-class projects. Some instructors even incorporate mobile devices, social media and the Internet into classroom activities to help students understand how to use technology in practical, productive ways."​((http://​everydaylife.globalpost.com/​technology-impact-schools-17781.html)) Many of these technologies are changing the environment a secondary education is obtained in, but in many ways students are obtaining more and more autonomy through the technological advancements making their way into schools, which in turn, changes the need for both teachers and a secondary education. While students cannot function entirely on their own, the changing landscape of education raises interesting questions as to what directions secondary and postsecondary education are going, and what role will both teachers and students themselves play in an evolving digital classroom. Neil Kokemuller reported, "​Classroom instruction has changed as well. Teachers are often evaluated by students on their use of audio-visual tools to enhance learning. In junior high, high school and college, PowerPoint is often used for typical daily lectures. Computer simulations,​ virtual models, smart boards and digital tools are also used for in-class instruction or out-of-class projects. Some instructors even incorporate mobile devices, social media and the Internet into classroom activities to help students understand how to use technology in practical, productive ways."​((http://​everydaylife.globalpost.com/​technology-impact-schools-17781.html)) Many of these technologies are changing the environment a secondary education is obtained in, but in many ways students are obtaining more and more autonomy through the technological advancements making their way into schools, which in turn, changes the need for both teachers and a secondary education. While students cannot function entirely on their own, the changing landscape of education raises interesting questions as to what directions secondary and postsecondary education are going, and what role will both teachers and students themselves play in an evolving digital classroom.
  
-As an agent of immense change, technology has heralded ​our present knowledge economy and given rise to a generation of students who have never known life without a computer. ​ +Every year there is new technology being created and has been a factor ​of immense change ​worldwide, technology has proclaimed ​our present knowledge economy and given rise to a generation of students who have never known life without a computer. These changes will have a significant effect on higher education. ​With time to come, advanced technologies will put education within the reach of many more individuals around the world, and will allow greater specialization in curriculum and teaching ​techniques ​than ever before. But perhaps the most critical question facing the academic world is something far more fundamental:​ namely, what it will mean to be an educated person in the 21st century. Societies around the world will need to consider how to make the most of these new opportunities and thus ensure that they remain competitive in the global marketplace. [(http://​www.nmc.org/​pdf/​Future-of-Higher-Ed-(NMC).pdf)]
-These changes will have a significant ​ripple ​effect on higher education. ​Over the next decade, advanced technologies will put education within the reach of many more individuals around the world, and will allow greater specialization in curriculum and teaching ​methodologies ​than ever before ​As ever, administrators will need to weigh carefully how budget funds are spent, decide what emerging technologies show the most promise, and determine how best to support these technological advances while avoiding the ever-present risk of obsolescence +
-But perhaps the most critical question facing the academic world is something far more fundamental:​ namely, what it will mean to be an educated person in the 21st century. Societies around the world will need to consider how to make the most of these new opportunities and thus ensure that they remain competitive in the global marketplace. [(http://​www.nmc.org/​pdf/​Future-of-Higher-Ed-(NMC).pdf)] +
need_for_secondary_education.txt · Last modified: 2015/03/23 00:37 by nlozano01_mail.roosevelt.edu