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facebook_twitter_youtube_instagram [2015/04/29 11:09]
jtorres24_mail.roosevelt.edu
facebook_twitter_youtube_instagram [2015/04/29 11:12] (current)
jtorres24_mail.roosevelt.edu
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-As far as many decades ago companies and employers use standard assessment tools, such as, job applications or resumes, in-person interviews, personal and professional references, and diplomas and transcripts. And depending on the position or nature of the job, employers would conduct criminal background checks, credit checks, drug tests, and even go as far as looking into a potential candidate’s medical history. However today, many employers have an additional source to screen future employees, social media. These social media platforms give a company or an employer a clear glimpse into the personal life of someone they are looking to hire, which could in turn ruin or affect an opportunity to be hired or offered a job for the potential candidate. Some of these factors ​including ​candidates posting provocative,​ inappropriate,​ or unprofessional pictures and information,​ bad-mouthing previous employers or companies, posting discriminatory comments, showing poor communication skills, criminal behaviors, and even lies about absences.[(http://​www.tlnt.com/​2014/​06/​26/​more-employers-not-hiring-due-to-what-they-find-on-social-media/​)] Social media and the information it provides the companies or employers can be a “double-edged sword” for potential candidates, it can tell a different side of who or what a person’s full potential or capabilities can be. Such information that be disclosed through social media, like Facebook or Instagram, are the applicant’s race, gender, national origin, color, religion, age, disability, or marital status. This brings up discussions of federal, state, and local anti-discrimination statutes that prohibits employers from making hiring or recruiting decisions, and the use of social media as a tool to do can bring up claims of discrimination by rejected candidates and the continuing issue of privacy and the candidates'​ rights.[(http://​www.newyorklawjournal.com/​id=1202719473182/​The-EEOC-Hears-Concerns-About-Social-Media-and-Hiring)]+As far as many decades ago companies and employers use standard assessment tools, such as, job applications or resumes, in-person interviews, personal and professional references, and diplomas and transcripts. And depending on the position or nature of the job, employers would conduct criminal background checks, credit checks, drug tests, and even go as far as looking into a potential candidate’s medical history. However today, many employers have an additional source to screen future employees, social media. These social media platforms give a company or an employer a clear glimpse into the personal life of someone they are looking to hire, which could in turn ruin or affect an opportunity to be hired or offered a job for the potential candidate. Some of these factors ​include ​candidates posting provocative,​ inappropriate,​ or unprofessional pictures and information,​ bad-mouthing previous employers or companies, posting discriminatory comments, showing poor communication skills, criminal behaviors, and even lies about absences.[(http://​www.tlnt.com/​2014/​06/​26/​more-employers-not-hiring-due-to-what-they-find-on-social-media/​)] Social media and the information it provides the companies or employers can be a “double-edged sword” for potential candidates, it can tell a different side of who or what a person’s full potential or capabilities can be. Such information that be disclosed through social media, like Facebook or Instagram, are the applicant’s race, gender, national origin, color, religion, age, disability, or marital status. This brings up discussions of federal, state, and local anti-discrimination statutes that prohibits employers from making hiring or recruiting decisions, and the use of social media as a tool to do can bring up claims of discrimination by rejected candidates and the continuing issue of privacy and the candidates'​ rights.[(http://​www.newyorklawjournal.com/​id=1202719473182/​The-EEOC-Hears-Concerns-About-Social-Media-and-Hiring)]
  
 On March 12, 2014 the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) organized a meeting to gather information on the use of social media in the workplace as a tool for hiring and recruitment and the impact it had on the federal laws. On that day the EEOC recognized that “the use of social media has become pervasive in today’s workplace” and said that the meeting “helped the EEOC understand how social media is being used in the employment context and what impact it may have on the laws we enforce and on our mission to stop and remedy discriminatory practices in the workplace”.[(http://​www.eeoc.gov/​eeoc/​meetings/​3-12-14/​jackson.cfm)] On March 12, 2014 the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) organized a meeting to gather information on the use of social media in the workplace as a tool for hiring and recruitment and the impact it had on the federal laws. On that day the EEOC recognized that “the use of social media has become pervasive in today’s workplace” and said that the meeting “helped the EEOC understand how social media is being used in the employment context and what impact it may have on the laws we enforce and on our mission to stop and remedy discriminatory practices in the workplace”.[(http://​www.eeoc.gov/​eeoc/​meetings/​3-12-14/​jackson.cfm)]
facebook_twitter_youtube_instagram.txt · Last modified: 2015/04/29 11:12 by jtorres24_mail.roosevelt.edu