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education_improving [2015/03/23 00:58] (current)
nlozano01_mail.roosevelt.edu created
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 +====== What is Technology'​s Affect on Those Formerly Doing Poorly in Academic Settings? ======
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 +Over the past two decades, the use of technology in classrooms across the United States has skyrocketed. Whether a school district is affluent or underfunded,​ technology has still managed to play a role in education, as districts attempt to prepare students for higher education and the need for a more skilled workforce. But evidence suggests that technology'​s integration into the classroom has not resulted in higher test scores. The New York Times reported:
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 +//To be sure, test scores can go up or down for many reasons. But to many education experts, something is not adding up — here and across the country. In a nutshell: schools are spending billions on technology, even as they cut budgets and lay off teachers, with little proof that this approach is improving basic learning.((http://​www.nytimes.com/​2011/​09/​04/​technology/​technology-in-schools-faces-questions-on-value.html?​pagewanted=all&​_r=0))//  ​
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 +The New York Times article supports what has become a growing opinion. The 1990s saw a fear that an undereducated American workforce would fall victim to a lack of education and thus lose in the competitive,​ globalized economy, so money poured into classroom technology. However, the results are less than thrilling for tests scores and educational improvement. But a Huffington Post article counters the opinions represented in the New York Times article:
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 +//We have schools and classrooms that are still doing what they’ve always done, but with some additional infrequent and marginal uses of new learning tools. We have educators who don’t really know how to use the tools very well and who also have little access to those tools, reliable IT support, and/or regular integration assistance. For some reason we expect changes in certain learning outcomes to occur anyway, despite these environmental factors and despite the fact that those outcomes may not be what the schools were striving for in the first place. And, if we don’t see those outcomes, we’re going to claim it’s the fault of the technologies themselves rather than human and system factors and then we’re going to claim that traditional analog learning environments are just fine in a digital, global world.((http://​www.huffingtonpost.com/​scott-mcleod/​schools-technology-test-s_b_952886.html))//​
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 +The truth of technology'​s role in improving the results of both poor and affluent school districts alike is probably somewhere in the middle. Just because test scores do not increase when technology is embraced does not mean a district should turn back the clock and abandon all technological measures. Society has yet to figure out the role of technology as a whole and education is no different than any other segment of society. A middle ground can and should be found instead of relying totally on one way of doing things, because it is still very hard to gauge the worth of technology to students.((http://​www.nytimes.com/​2011/​09/​04/​technology/​technology-in-schools-faces-questions-on-value.html?​pagewanted=all&​_r=0))
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 +A study published on whitehouse.gov perfectly exemplifies how a more traditional approach that is formed to students'​ needs, coupled with proper allocation of technology results in better outcomes. The study states:
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 +//There are several studies of promising new teaching methods that use technology based learning, personalized approaches, and increased instructional time. One study found that middle schools and high schools that adopted an Algebra I curriculum that used a personalized,​ blended learning approach [that ensures students master subjects before progressing] significantly boosted high school Algebra scores by enough to move a student at the 50th to the 58th percentile. Another study found that teachers who used classroom connectivity technology in Algebra I led to a statistically significant effect on achievement. An additional study found that doubling math instructional time for underprepared high school freshmen through a teaching strategy that allowed students to develop intermediate math skills before moving on to Algebra instruction improved math achievement and led to more positive attitudes about math.((http://​www.whitehouse.gov/​sites/​default/​files/​docs/​white_house_report_on_increasing_college_opportunity_for_low-income_students_1-16-2014_final.pdf))//​
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 +Typically, the reasons for doing poorly to begin with are tied to economics and underfunding. Because of this, the role of technology in the classroom is tied to barriers of entry. Even if technology can improve test scores, underprivileged students need the funding to gain access to technology. The Bronzeville Scholastic Institute, on Chicago'​s South Side, sees 24 computers shared by over one thousand students. Nick Pandolfo reported:
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 +//Even though Chicago Public Schools reports spending about $40 million a year on technology, Bronzeville Scholastic lags behind its peers and exemplifies a dangerous disparity that exists in the United States, according to Susan Patrick, president and CEO of the International Association for K-12 Online Learning.
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 +"​Chicago in particular probably highlights the digital divide that's across the country,"​ Patrick said. "Some schools may have access to one-to-one pilots, and other schools have old infrastructure that is barely functional, so that kids don't have access to the computers."//​((http://​www.huffingtonpost.com/​2012/​01/​24/​education-technology-as-s_n_1228072.html))
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 +Chicago'​s Bronzeville Scholastic Institue faces the problems many urban schools face. Underfunding,​ overcrowding,​ and a lack of access creates a digital divide that leaves students poorly prepared for both further education and employment.((http://​sitemaker.umich.edu/​lem.smith/​integrating_computers_into_urban_schools))
  
education_improving.txt · Last modified: 2015/03/23 00:58 by nlozano01_mail.roosevelt.edu