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barriers_to_entry_facts_vs._skill_and_the_need_for_secondary_education [2014/04/28 15:18]
jevans19 [Does Technology Change the Need for Secondary/Postsecondary Education?]
barriers_to_entry_facts_vs._skill_and_the_need_for_secondary_education [2015/03/23 00:38]
nlozano01_mail.roosevelt.edu
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 //Educators struggle with the problem of overcoming the inertia of instructioal practices in the traditional classroom (Trimble,​2003). In these traditional classrooms, students are typically not provided with whole, dynamic learning experiences,​ but rather with limited, arbitrary activities. Schools frequently teach information from the various disciplines without providing adequate con-textual support with opportunities for students to apply what they are taught. “The resulting inauthenticity of classroom activity makes it difficult for children to see how school learning applies to their lives”//​((http://​files.eric.ed.gov/​fulltext/​EJ768721.pdf)) //Educators struggle with the problem of overcoming the inertia of instructioal practices in the traditional classroom (Trimble,​2003). In these traditional classrooms, students are typically not provided with whole, dynamic learning experiences,​ but rather with limited, arbitrary activities. Schools frequently teach information from the various disciplines without providing adequate con-textual support with opportunities for students to apply what they are taught. “The resulting inauthenticity of classroom activity makes it difficult for children to see how school learning applies to their lives”//​((http://​files.eric.ed.gov/​fulltext/​EJ768721.pdf))
  
-It remains to be seen how much the relationship between facts and skills will change, but the chase for skill sets is pressuring strict memorization in school settingand technology has a role in the transformationOddly enoughtest scores do not seem to be improving with added tech in classroomsso the educational environment remains in constant flux. +Technology in the classroom may be considered a tool for learningas some might think but can also bring about few issues. One issue being, the ability of teachers maintaining their students’ attentionAccess to Internetallows students the opportunity ​to research information rather than listen to their teacher’s lecture. Consequentlythreatening ​the teacher’s ability to teachThis brings up the question, does technology help studentsThe article, "Most Powerful Tool in the Classroom"​ from Huffingtonpost.com reports:
-====== Does Technology Change ​the Need for Secondary/​Postsecondary Education======+
  
-As the role of technology in the classroom expands and adapts, the role of education itself also changesWhile many nations ​have deemed it necessary ​to provide basic educations to citizenstraditional education models ​have begun taking a backseat ​to the acquisition of skillsIf skills are the true barometer of learning and economic progress, then grade levels and test scores take on less importance.+//"The hard truth is that the tech-savvy students ​of today do not want to be lectured to about facts they can instantly find with the click of a button on their smart phonesSiri can often give a more comprehensive answer than many of us on any given topic. Therefore, the honest truth is that HOW we teach must change. Making students memorize rote facts and regurgitate them is no longer sensible, and educators now have the opportunity ​to have students think much more criticallysolve problems, and use their creativity in ways they never have been pushed ​to do in the past."//​[(http://​www.huffingtonpost.com/​sarah-wike-loyola/​the-most-powerful-tool-in_b_6012136.html)]
  
-The World Bank issued a report on the relationship between technology and secondary education. Within the report, it became increasingly clear that the goals for both advanced and industrializing nations were tied to an educated workforce: 
  
-//​Globalization,​ the increased importance of knowledge as a driving force in economic development,​ and the skill-biased nature of technological changes in the workplace are putting additional pressures on national governments to modernize and revamp their secondary education systems in order to produce graduates who are well prepared to enter the work force or institutions of higher learning. ​ Information and communication technologies (ICTs) are transforming teaching and learning processes in educational systems worldwide.((http://​web.worldbank.org/​WBSITE/​EXTERNAL/​TOPICS/​EXTEDUCATION/​0,,​contentMDK:​20521328~menuPK:​738179~pagePK:​148956~piPK:​216618~theSitePK:​282386~isCURL:​Y,​00.html#​technology))//​  +It remains ​to be seen how much the relationship between facts and skills ​will changebut the chase for skill sets is pressuring strict memorization ​in a school setting, and technology has a role in the transformationOddly enoughtest scores do not seem to be improving with added tech in classroomsso the educational ​environment ​remains ​in constant flux.
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-It is becoming increasingly possible ​to learn from faculty from the top universities without leaving your own home, regardless of age and income.((http://​www.forbes.com/​sites/​groupthink/​2012/​12/​11/​5-ways-technology-will-impact-higher-ed-in-2013/​)) Coupled with the growth in online access to coursesstudent mobility and globalization is growing in a similar manner as trade. Students are more international,​ and borders have fallen as the pursuit of skills has broken down borders and rendered institutions less important.((http://​www.uvic.ca/​strategicplan/​home/​context/​changing.php)) Another article examining the technological trends in education reported: +
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-//There are many opportunities ​for individual students to use technology to enhance their learning. These include online courses that provide students ​in remote locations with opportunities for customized curriculum and advanced placement courses. These courses are conducted entirely online and offer asynchronous interaction among faculty and students. Because they allow students to participate anytime and from anywhere, online courses are becoming increasingly popular among postsecondary students whose job and personal commitments do not allow them to meet regular class schedule.//​((http://​education.stateuniversity.com/​pages/​2497/​Technology-in-Education.html))  +
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-A globalizing affect in postsecondary education could possibly trickle down to secondary educationas barriers become meaningless ​and teachers can engage with students regardless of location. Income and social status can become irrelevant if access to technology is obtained, but access to technology has to overcome ​"​digital divide" ​in which underprivileged students lack the skills and confidence needed to gain the proper use out of technology in regards to education.((http://​futureofchildren.org/​publications/​journals/​article/​index.xml?​journalid=79&​articleid=585&​sectionid=4061)) +
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-Neil Kokemuller reported"​Classroom instruction has changed as well. Teachers are often evaluated by students on their use of audio-visual tools to enhance learning. In junior high, high school and college, PowerPoint is often used for typical daily lectures. Computer simulations,​ virtual models, smart boards and digital tools are also used for in-class instruction or out-of-class projects. Some instructors even incorporate mobile devicessocial media and the Internet into classroom activities to help students understand how to use technology in practical, productive ways."​((http://​everydaylife.globalpost.com/​technology-impact-schools-17781.html)) Many of these technologies are changing ​the environment ​a secondary education is obtained in, but in many ways students are obtaining more and more autonomy through the technological advancements making their way into schools, which in turn, changes the need for both teachers and a secondary education. While students cannot function entirely on their own, the changing landscape of education raises interesting questions as to what directions secondary and postsecondary education are going, and what role will both teachers and students themselves play in an evolving digital classroom.+
  
  
barriers_to_entry_facts_vs._skill_and_the_need_for_secondary_education.txt · Last modified: 2015/03/23 00:38 by nlozano01_mail.roosevelt.edu