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a_government_powered_through_information_gathering [2014/04/23 12:00]
nalioualla
a_government_powered_through_information_gathering [2014/04/26 23:35] (current)
nalioualla
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-The concern of governments gathering information about its people has long been an issue but not until recently, with the advancements in communication technologies (e.g., computer, social media, and smart phones), have people began to argue against such a thing (1). As stated the section, Privacy and Digital Feudalism, many of the information freely given to these sites and services by majority of individuals are stored and recorded for analysis. Facebook for example is a major holder of personal internet information as people see no harm in sharing personal feelings, interests, and actions on the site as it is a "​social media" tool. This however is a double edged sword, no matter how powerful and wide reaching Facebook and its counterparts are, this is also true for business that use the internet, the government ultimately has authoritative control over them. Any violation for cooperation with a government agency can result in numerous penalties (1). The purpose or driving force for this is presumably the incorporation of the Patriot Act after the Sept 11 attacks on the twin towers, which also enforced several other infringements on privacy (1). In the name of national security, however, the American people saw no issue with it. Later on when the government caught on to how popular the internet became it was critical that the Patriot Act's reach also contained this avenue of information as well, and it was eventually granted such right (1). This requires everyone, libraries, bookstores, universities,​ and internet services to turn information on customers over to the FBI upon request (1). In fact the previously undisclosed NSA has direct access to the systems of Google, Facebook, Apple and other internet giants of the US (5). Although the Act was initially perceived in a positive manner it has recently created an uproar of disapproval stating that it is a direct violation of the Fourth Amendment, as it is a search without probable cause (1). After the attacks on Sept 11, national security has reached elevated levels. Many people are concerned about the degree of information collected as well as the unknowns, what are they looking for, when are they looking, and how often (2). For most law abiding citizens this isn't a problem but with the addition of secret wiretaps and searches many are becoming alarmed (2). As indicated before this can be down without just cause or warning (2). An article published in the Wall Street Journal recently revealed that the NSA, a government entity, has a far reaching hold of information record (3). These powers are currently used to gain records from the three major phone networks, emails, web searches, and credit-card transactions (3). The collections of information gathered are said to be a major contributor toward effort against terrorism (3). Supporters of the American Civil Liberties Union, a group whose main goal is to protect the individual rights and liberties of the people, argue that these actions by the NSA and other possible unrivaled government agencies are in direct violation of said rights (4). The reason for of the collection of data is driven by no more than the possibilities that such an attempted terrorist would be so careless enough as to disclose/​discuss plans via web technologies (4). Drawing back on the Patriot Act discussed earlier, Section 215 added later, which allows for acquisition of phone metadata or surveillance is used mostly as a way to gather information and build a virtual online profile of people which can be used later on (4). The amount of information capacity collected by the government is massive as its database collects billions of communications records per day (6). As impressive as that number many be even more impressive is Edward Snowdens ability to gain access to this information from such a high tech top secret agency (7).\\+The concern of governments gathering information about its people has long been an issue but not until recently, with the advancements in communication technologies (e.g., computer, social media, and smart phones), have people began to argue against such a thing (1). As stated the section, Privacy and Digital Feudalism, many of the information freely given to these sites and services by majority of individuals are stored and recorded for analysis. Facebook for example is a major holder of personal internet information as people see no harm in sharing personal feelings, interests, and actions on the site as it is a "​social media" tool. This however is a double edged sword, no matter how powerful and wide reaching Facebook and its counterparts are, this is also true for business that use the internet, the government ultimately has authoritative control over them. Any violation for cooperation with a government agency can result in numerous penalties (1). The purpose or driving force for this is presumably the incorporation of the Patriot Act after the Sept 11 attacks on the twin towers, which also enforced several other infringements on privacy (1). In the name of national security, however, the American people saw no issue with it. Later on when the government caught on to how popular the internet became it was critical that the Patriot Act's reach also contained this avenue of information as well, and it was eventually granted such right (1). This requires everyone, libraries, bookstores, universities,​ and internet services to turn information on customers over to the FBI upon request (1). In fact the previously undisclosed NSA has direct access to the systems of Google, Facebook, Apple and other internet giants of the US (5). Although the Act was initially perceived in a positive manner it has recently created an uproar of disapproval stating that it is a direct violation of the Fourth Amendment, as it is a search without probable cause (1). After the attacks on Sept 11, national security has reached elevated levels. Many people are concerned about the degree of information collected as well as the unknowns, what are they looking for, when are they looking, and how often (2). For most law abiding citizens this isn't a problem but with the addition of secret wiretaps and searches many are becoming alarmed (2). As indicated before this can be down without just cause or warning (2). An article published in the Wall Street Journal recently revealed that the NSA, a government entity, has a far reaching hold of information record (3). These powers are currently used to gain records from the three major phone networks, emails, web searches, and credit-card transactions (3). The collections of information gathered are said to be a major contributor toward effort against terrorism (3). Supporters of the American Civil Liberties Union, a group whose main goal is to protect the individual rights and liberties of the people, argue that these actions by the NSA and other possible unrivaled government agencies are in direct violation of said rights (4). The reason for of the collection of data is driven by no more than the possibilities that such an attempted terrorist would be so careless enough as to disclose/​discuss plans via web technologies (4). Drawing back on the Patriot Act discussed earlier, Section 215 added later, which allows for acquisition of phone metadata or surveillance is used mostly as a way to gather information and build a virtual online profile of people which can be used later on (4). The amount of information capacity collected by the government is massive as its database collects billions of communications records per day (6). As impressive as that number many be even more impressive is Edward Snowdens ability to gain access to this information from such a high tech top secret agency ​and then reveal it to the world (7). Many people advocate for Snowden'​s action saying that it is their right to make decisions on data collection and that he did the citizens a great service (8). Others on the opposite side argue that what he did was a great breach in government security and could have left the nation very vulnerable (8). \\
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 7)http://​www.theguardian.com/​world/​2013/​jun/​09/​edward-snowden-nsa-whistleblower-surveillance 7)http://​www.theguardian.com/​world/​2013/​jun/​09/​edward-snowden-nsa-whistleblower-surveillance
 +
 +8)http://​www.cnn.com/​2013/​06/​10/​politics/​edward-snowden-profile/​
a_government_powered_through_information_gathering.txt ยท Last modified: 2014/04/26 23:35 by nalioualla